Things are Looking Up

October 1st, 2010
by Alfonso Ebanks

[private] Things are Looking UpOn the first of July the lobster season opened with an increase in the price of this delectable crustacean. This was good news for the people that depend of this type of fishing for their livelihood. This means that almost everybody of the island was happy because we all depend on the money produced by the sale of this cousin to the crab.

The month of July is also when we Bonakians celebrate our Conch Festival  so the last week of the month was a joyous time for the whole island with mini-carnivals in the four mayor villages of the of the island. This is the third consecutive year of this celebration and I believe we have finally got our stuff together.  The first year we celebrated the whole week culminating in the great event on the beaches of El Soldado, well this year there were no exception every thing went great and there was dancing in the streets to the rhythmic beat of the imported bands.  The final event of the beach was very impressive; the unrehearsed plot performed by our improvised actors recounted the drama of the Landing of the Great navigator on the very spot that the event occurred some 508 years ago. The dialogue on the beach was electronically amplified and every word could be heard as the Indian braves held the Spaniards on the beach with bows and arrows until the arrival of their leader.

The Indian Chief in full regalia and surrounded by beautiful Indian princesses in their brightly colored attire came down the river in a dugout canoe to meet the admiral.   The big difference this year was that the majority of the visitors we had were our own people that has been dispersed all over the world among then were some that had not visited us in decades but swears that they won’t miss another Conch Festival. In spite of the large crowds on the beaches and in the villages and on the narrow streets of our main town, there were no incidents of violence or other negative occurrences. People had no time for quarrels because everybody was filled with the festival spirit and we were surrounded by music and mirthfulness and people dancing in the streets.  The vendors vended and the buyers bought.

The people in charge of the festival are right now making plans for next year and promise a much greater event in 2011. With the price of lobster up about 40 percent  from last year and the very good possibilities of turning the Conch Festival into a money producing touristic event, I would venture to say that things are looking up for the forgotten island in the Bay of Honduras. As July ended with the crowds gazing skyward as the fireworks soared into evening sky, I could feel a change in the attitude of my people as the hopes of all the people of Bonacco soared to a new high as we promised ourselves to build ourselves a brighter future.

n the first of July the lobster season opened with an increase in the price of this delectable crustacean. This was good news for the people that depend of this type of fishing for their livelihood. This means that almost everybody of the island was happy because we all depend on the money produced by the sale of this cousin to the crab.
The month of July is also when we Bonakians celebrate our Conch Festival  so the last week of the month was a joyous time for the whole island with mini-carnivals in the four mayor villages of the of the island. This is the third consecutive year of this celebration and I believe we have finally got our stuff together.  The first year we celebrated the whole week culminating in the great event on the beaches of El Soldado, well this year there were no exception every thing went great and there was dancing in the streets to the rhythmic beat of the imported bands.  The final event of the beach was very impressive; the unrehearsed plot performed by our improvised actors recounted the drama of the Landing of the Great navigator on the very spot that the event occurred some 508 years ago. The dialogue on the beach was electronically amplified and every word could be heard as the Indian braves held the Spaniards on the beach with bows and arrows until the arrival of their leader.
The Indian Chief in full regalia and surrounded by beautiful Indian princesses in their brightly colored attire came down the river in a dugout canoe to meet the admiral.   The big difference this year was that the majority of the visitors we had were our own people that has been dispersed all over the world among then were some that had not visited us in decades but swears that they won’t miss another Conch Festival. In spite of the large crowds on the beaches and in the villages and on the narrow streets of our main town, there were no incidents of violence or other negative occurrences. People had no time for quarrels because everybody was filled with the festival spirit and we were surrounded by music and mirthfulness and people dancing in the streets.  The vendors vended and the buyers bought.
The people in charge of the festival are right now making plans for next year and promise a much greater event in 2011. With the price of lobster up about 40 percent  from last year and the very good possibilities of turning the Conch Festival into a money producing touristic event, I would venture to say that things are looking up for the forgotten island in the Bay of Honduras. As July ended with the crowds gazing skyward as the fireworks soared into evening sky, I could feel a change in the attitude of my people as the hopes of all the people of Bonacco soared to a new high as we promised ourselves to build ourselves a brighter future.

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