The West End Facelift
Long Anticipated Paving of West End Road, Sewage System is Coming, Authorities Say

February 1st, 2011
by Thomas Tomczyk

[private]

A Main street of West End after a storm.

A Main street of West End after a storm.

After years of no infrastructure investment in West End, Roatan’s tourist hub, the Municipality is taking an initiative to improve the community’s sewer and road. To help cover the cost of the project a trust was set up at Banco Atlantida in the amount of Lps. 14 million. “I saved as much money as I could last year,” said Mayor Julio Galindo, who hopes he can increase the trust to Lps. 47 million to be able to cover other infrastructure projects in his municipality.

The funding of these types of projects by each one of Honduras’ 298 municipalities has become more difficult. Honduras just lost the $200 million in World Bank 2011 assistance from “Fondo Prosperidad,” because the country was assessed as having fallen in the rankings in corruption. This money was destined for infrastructure projects–roads, business loans and tourism.

The black water project for 3,000 West End residents is estimated to cost around Lps. 15 million and to begin in March. So far 19 companies, four of them based on Roatan, have submitted their Bona Fide credentials for West End project bid. The deadline for the bid itself is scheduled for February 11. “We hope to have the project finished by summer,” said Mayor Galindo

The weak point of the plan is to pay for the black water plant, but not to leave any money for the expense of connecting people to the main lines, ” says Dan Taylor, who believes that this was the major flaw in the construction and funding of the Coxen Hole black water treatment plan. Dan Taylor’s ACME Environmental is one of the companies bidding for the project in West End.

West End property owners are expected to pay around $17 a month until the sewer project is paid off, currently estimated to be around nine years. “By law I have to charge property owners for some of the cost involved in these projects,” said Mayor Galindo. The corporation decides on the percentage rate of the cost of each individual project that property owners have to pay.

West End road is planned to be paved along a roughly one kilometer stretch–from Woody’s grocery store to Miller’s Avenue. The black water system will serve almost the entire community, from Seagrape in the north to Miller’s Avenue in the south. “It [the road] is going to be concrete, but we are working with the community to decide the color,” said Mayor Galindo.

Other projects still in the planning stages include a mile-long Coxen Hole seawall and walkway. “It’s very ambitious, but it’s my idea of how to kill three birds with one stone,” said Mayor Galindo. The one-mile-long seawall would be created from the fill (excavation) of the “North Hill” at Roatan Airport, which would allow for the airport to expand, and according to Mayor Galindo, beautify Coxen Hole, expand its shopping appeal and ease traffic congestion. The seawall, running from Port of Roatan to the Point, would also serve to run the sewer lines and electrical lines. “I’m trying to do projects that are not so popular but need to be done,” says Mayor Galindo.

Yet another infrastructure plan in the making is related to the municipal garbage dump that is projected to reach capacity in 1-2 years time. Mayor Galindo says that the Municipality is looking at purchasing an adjacent site for the expansion of the Roatan Municipal dump. “We want to make a sports facility on the site of the old dump,” says Mayor Galindo, who envisions a possible Municipal football stadium. Galindo believes that this would not only fill a need for sporting facilities on the island, but would also raise interest in how the dump is managed and how it looks, if people were involved in activities close to it.

After years of no infrastructure investment in West End, Roatan’s tourist hub, the Municipality is taking an initiative to improve the community’s sewer and road. To help cover the cost of the project a trust was set up at Banco Atlantida in the amount of Lps. 14 million. “I saved as much money as I could last year,” said Mayor Julio Galindo, who hopes he can increase the trust to Lps. 47 million to be able to cover other infrastructure projects in his municipality.

The funding of these types of projects by each one of Honduras’ 298 municipalities has become more difficult. Honduras just lost the $200 million in World Bank 2011 assistance from “Fondo Prosperidad,” because the country was assessed as having fallen in the rankings in corruption. This money was destined for infrastructure projects–roads, business loans and tourism.

The black water project for 3,000 West End residents is estimated to cost around Lps. 15 million and to begin in March. So far 19 companies, four of them based on Roatan, have submitted their Bona Fide credentials for West End project bid. The deadline for the bid itself is scheduled for February 11. “We hope to have the project finished by summer,” said Mayor Galindo.

“The weak point of the plan is to pay for the black water plant, but not to leave any money for the expense of connecting people to the main lines, ” says Dan Taylor, who believes that this was the major flaw in the construction and funding of the Coxen Hole black water treatment plan. Dan Taylor’s ACME Environmental is one of the companies bidding for the project in West End.

West End property owners are expected to pay around $17 a month until the sewer project is paid off, currently estimated to be around nine years. “By law I have to charge property owners for some of the cost involved in these projects,” said Mayor Galindo. The corporation decides on the percentage rate of the cost of each individual project that property owners have to pay.

West End road is planned to be paved along a roughly one kilometer stretch–from Woody’s grocery store to Miller’s Avenue. The black water system will serve almost the entire community, from Seagrape in the north to Miller’s Avenue in the south. “It [the road] is going to be concrete, but we are working with the community to decide the color,” said Mayor Galindo.

Other projects still in the planning stages include a mile-long Coxen Hole seawall and walkway. “It’s very ambitious, but it’s my idea of how to kill three birds with one stone,” said Mayor Galindo. The one-mile-long seawall would be created from the fill (excavation) of the “North Hill” at Roatan Airport, which would allow for the airport to expand, and according to Mayor Galindo, beautify Coxen Hole, expand its shopping appeal and ease traffic congestion. The seawall, running from Port of Roatan to the Point, would also serve to run the sewer lines and electrical lines. “I’m trying to do projects that are not so popular but need to be done,” says Mayor Galindo.

Yet another infrastructure plan in the making is related to the municipal garbage dump that is projected to reach capacity in 1-2 years time. Mayor Galindo says that the Municipality is looking at purchasing an adjacent site for the expansion of the Roatan Municipal dump. “We want to make a sports facility on the site of the old dump,” says Mayor Galindo, who envisions a possible Municipal football stadium. Galindo believes that this would not only fill a need for sporting facilities on the island, but would also raise interest in how the dump is managed and how it looks, if people were involved in activities close to it. [/private]

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