Calendar Style
January, 2007 Vol.5 No.1
monthly news magazine for
Roatan, Utila & Guanaja
fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: It was impossible to decide who was dressed the best, but Ellen Van der Weg definitely placed in the front of the peleton. Showing her athletic shoulders in the black, strapless dress, Ellen enjoyed the spotlight at the Roatan Christmas Concert. Ellen, 40, a property manager living in West End is from Holland and has lived on Roatan for four years. Married to Robert, last year Ellen celebrated having her second baby- Vince, now 19 month by attending the first Christmas Concert.
WHAT & WHY: The gala motivated the Holland native to dress to impress. "I went for the material," says Ellen about her all 100% silk dress by Dolce Jovan. Red on the inside, black on the outside the dress was first featured at a church wedding in Tegucigalpa. "I arrived a day before a wedding and bought this at the old Tegus mall," says Ellen. The size 4 dress, purchased for Lps. 4,800 fit her like a glove. A single, tasteful accessory, black bag with a silver rectangle by… well. "Its Dior… authentic Dior," says ever optimistic Ellen about her Lps. 400 purse Ellen. A very practical, Dutch, Ellen loves the idea of finding something she likes only two flight hoops away. "The important thing is you can buy these things in Honduras," she says. Ellen high heels by Via España No. 6 were also a golden opportunity find at the Tegucigalpa mall. A black strap with a string of diamonds-like jewels. Lps. 550. A silver necklace and "at least" 20 diamonds- Lps. 300. Ellen has found the jewelry pieces at the same store as her dress. One of her two rings was a West Bay purchase- $10 three years ago and likely, like anything in West Bay, to have tripled in value. The purplish stone set in silver was purchased from one of the stands in front of Mayan Princess.
IN CONCLUSION: Living for long enough on Roatan Ellen was surprised to find something to match her taste and expectations somewhere closer by then US. "If you're living on this island and you go to Tegus to shop every shop looks wow! wonderful," says Ellen. "Many people say I look gorgeous… and are amazed that bought it in Honduras."

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?:We cought up with congresswoman Marcia Papuzet Villera as she was departing Roatan after an all night session of Congress. Marcia has bee married for 22 years to a TV producer Jose, and is a mother of four children: 21, 16, 12, 4. She studied Business Administration at Loyola College in New Orleans and has worked in politics for 16 years, before running for congress as a Liberal party candidate. On November 28 she raised her hand to make Bay Islands a free zone. "I love politics, but most of all I love to serve my people," in a society where you could do that.
"WHAT & WHY:"I love buying things made in Honduras," says Marcia, who found her unusual headwear, a red baseball hat with white daisies, at her friend Bianca's store- 'Blanche' in Tegucigalpa. While the hat is more assembled than made in Honduras, it is nevertheless a great fashion accessory at Lps. 600. "Whenever I see something different I buy it," commented Marcia. Her red flowing top, was purchased at a Zara store in Mexico, for a nifty $27. Her long white embroidered skirt, was another purchase from Mexico, at a 'Made in Mexico store,' for an affordable $12. "Sometimes I like dressing in long skirts, and other times I like to dress sexy. If I know I am going to a party I will dress really funky," explained the Francisco Morazan legislator. The flip flops studded with silver circles, were a Nine-West purchase from Marcia's trip to Spain- $25. Her purse, a brave $900 purchase, was found at a Luis Vitton store. It's a purse that can go with anything- an attribute you just can't spend enough money on. "What I like to spend money on is purses and watches," said Marcia, showing her gold and diamond studded Rolex - a gift from Marcia's mother-in-law Tina. Marcia wears a fair amount of jewelry, but two pieces stand out the most. One is a white gold bracelet studded with diamonds. Another Honduras original was Marcia's encrusted wood bracelet, with images of Virgin Mary, holy child, and several saints. It was a blessing to be found at a catholic relics store in Tegucigalpa- Lps. 40. "In this dress I am wearing I feel more romantic, so I feel free," says Marcia.
IN CONCLUSION: Fashion has become a secret weapon of choice for this Liberal legislator. Marcia stands out in a crowd of Honduran, or for that matter any, legislators. She is setting a trend that is not easy to follow. Barely ten months in office, this fresh Congress woman, is already a fashion leader for both her Liberal and National partners. "In this congress, they are making a bit more effort in how they dress. They feel there is a bit more competition," says Marcia, who believes that some congress people made some adjustments to her style of being. "I like to hug people. I am very expressive and I like to tell people how much I love them," says this feisty Tegucigalpa politician. "That is not usual in a political environment."

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?:You can run into just about any kind of attire on the streets of the Roatan capital: lawyers in business suits, municipal police with golden epaulets, baggy jeaned teenagers, and of course- flip-flopping tourists wearing tropical scene shirts, shorts, bikinis and dresses. We caught Victoria Bachlowa, a Canadian, as she was doing her Coxen Hole errands, paying Lps. 500 parking fine for parking on a sidewalk, banking, etc. Victoria was a music writer in Los Angeles where she wrote pop songs for rock music artists such as Stevie Natalie, David Prophet amongst others, and a song "A Ring On Every Finger," soon to be released.
"WHAT & WHY: Victoria admits that this was her errands attire: "Its very island." Her blue and red cotton tropical scene one piece dress, camouflages her perfectly as a tourist. It is very easy to mistake Victoria for one of the cruise ship tourists visiting Roatan. But looks can be deceiving as Victoria knows her way around the island and can spot a fashion bargain in a New York minute. "I found it in one of the stores on the side of the road," says Victoria about her beach dress. "This is my sloppy look." Her violet flip-flops were a bargain Lps. 80 at the Coxen Hole Carrion. A red purse by 'Milano' was a quick $10 at…. You guessed it… Carrion in Coxen Hole. "Look! It even matches my dress," exclaimed Victoria. In fact Victoria will go to just about any length towards finding a bargain. A couple of weeks ago an opportunity for a nifty pair of sunglasses literally walked right into Victoria's office. "I found them. Someone left them in my office," she explains her finders-keepers fashion policy. "If they see it on my face they can have it back," clarified Victoria who has to be one of the few women living on Roatan that doesn't wear any jewelry, watches… well, at least until someone would leave it at her office.
IN CONCLUSION: Victoria moved to Roatan a year ago and manages 'Sanctuary,' a property in Sandy Bay, a job that carries no dress code description, but nevertheless asks for "no sloppy attire." "I can dress whichever way I want. Sometime I wear a bathing suit all day long," says Victoria. In her spare time Victoria tackles complexities of islands energy crisis and completed a wind turbine study for RECO. Results remain are not yet released.

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?:Julia Alexandra Centeno Ramon Keller, 34, was born on Utila and grew-up in La Ceiba. She owns and manages the Jade Seahorse Cabins and Restaurant. Julia is a mother of two daughters, Tempie and Juneil, and a wife to Neil Keller, a multi media artist, collector and local personality. "I have to support my husband so he can keep himself entertained," Julia describes her role. The two met when backpacker Neil hypnotized waitperson Julia during a three day restaurant sojourn. "He would just sit there for three days and sip a soda," says Julia. It all ended well.
"WHAT & WHY: Julia bought her black spandex Forever 21 pants for $10 at a Los Angeles mall. "It's the pants that I wore for every occasion. They got me out a lot of emergencies," says Julia. "I tried twice to get rid of them. But they always come back." Her orange, cotton top is also clothing from the past. Bought for $8, "they fit me differently than I'd like to," says Julia who often passes her too-big clothes to chosen friends and some family, especially her sister Leafy. Sometime Julia runs into people wearing her old clothes. "I can't believe I was that size once." From a recent visit to US, Neil brought Julia a pair of orange strap flip flops by Teva. Her multicolored scarf was bought at a Guatemalan market for 8 Quetzals. Turtle shaped black coral earrings were a steal, Lps. 30, from a jewelry store "Joyeria Maya" in La Ceiba.
IN CONCLUSION: After losing 75 pounds, she is now size 7-8, down from 16 just nine months ago. Julia has changed her looks and attitude by changing her diet: she is a vegan. Her transformation begun in October 2005, when after taking an Utila Adventist Church two-day seminar on healthy eating, Julia decided to change her life around and become a vegan. "Within five days I felt different." Her blood pressure lowered, her head cleared, skin felt and looked better, and she has more energy and even smiles more. The diet has come with a lifestyle change. Julia can seldom eat-out because most restaurants use precuts containing animal fats, processed, and cooked food. She is happy and content leading others to the diet of fruits, nuts, vegetables and grains. Julia offers to teach her diet techniques to locals and tourists. And with 0.2% of adult Americans being vegan, Julia is a part of 7,000 strong and healthy community.

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?:Attitude can be all you need to succeed in business. Some people, particularly in sales, take years to realize and develop the winning attitude. Samanta Ariola, 7, was born with the winning attitude and even her business might be small, it is growing. By the time Samanta will turn 10 she might own a chain of bakeries throughout Roatan. Watch out. Samanta is from French Harbour and attends second grade at French Cay Elementary School. Her mother Jorani makes the 60 bread rolls six times a week that Samanta takes to around 50 houses and businesses throughout French Harbour. She has been selling bread for three years and most of French Harbour has seen her at one time or another. When asked what she enjoys best about her work Samanta plainly replies: "I like best when people buy my bread."
"WHAT & WHY: Her neighbor, Miss Shelby, gave her a white round brimmed hat that Samanta now wears for added support when carrying her aluminum pot filled to the brim with aromatic bread rolls. Her Scottish pattern bandana was a gift from her mom Jorani and other that just giving Samanta the pirate look, it also covers her painful ear. Her aqua shirt was bought for Lps. 50 at "un bulto" or a place selling used clothes, donated by Americans to Goodwill and such. Samanta keeps her earnings securely in her zip-up Barbie purse. The pink and blue accessory, given by cousin Kandy, nicely matches her blouse and her beach shorts. Her friend Allison, living in the US, gave Samanta the brave and colorful beach shorts. Her leather strap "faded Glory" flip-flops are pure functionality for anyone making a living treading the dusty French Harbour streets. Samanta's one jewelry piece is her one gold colored spherical earring (she lost the other one), given by her mom.
IN CONCLUSION: Working basically on a string budget and with some help of fashion conscious neighbors and friends, Samanta has assembled a functional ensemble that is not only professional, but it has just the right amount of rebellious attitude any seven-year-old could ask for.

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: Wendy Flores, 26, from Santa Barbara is spending a bit of time vacationing on Roatan and helping her sister at a local pharmacy. She lives in New Orleans and works as a graphic designer, but is already thinking about opening a restaurant on Roatan.
"WHAT & WHY: Wendy's 'Forever 21,' brown, embroidered blouse was bought in Tegucigalpa's La Femme store for $20. Also at the same store, Wendy bought her white, weave belt with silver lining- $30. Wendy's white cotton capri pants were bought for $30 at a US mall. Her large bag by 'So-so' was a Macy's purchase for $50. Her brown, plastic shades were bought in the US for $12. Her Tegucigalpa's 'Gold House' earrings, round and gold-plated, were $50. Her golden, heart shaped pendant was a gift from her mother Margarite on Wendy's 15th birthday. Her 4 inch heel shoes were a gift from a Tegucigalpa girlfriend, Jenny. With white rap-around lace, they serve not as much to stabilize the ankle, as to add a visual interest to the feet. "She knows I love strange shoes and for her this was a strange shoe," explains Wendy who is still breaking her shoes in, as the streets of Coxen Hole provide a perfect obstacle course for breaking in any type of shoe wear. Even though some people might consider the four inch cork heel extreme, Wendy's 5'-6" frame turns into an impressive 5'-10" model.
IN CONCLUSION: Even eight inch heels can sometime be seen on the streets of some metropolises, but require a front toe elevation of three inches. Looking tall and in style is not for the faint hearted and can end in disaster. Hospitals from Paris, Manhattan, and even Tegucigalpa treat twisted and broken ankles of women who fell from their platforms. Wendy's platforms could in fact be the highest of any shoes currently worn on Roatan streets, not because Roatan girls don't want to seem taller, or in vogue, as much as how difficult it is to walk on the potholed, uneven surfaces.

 

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?:This free spirited 70s clean-cut hippie hails from Santa Monica, California and made her way to Roatan 20+ years ago. For Terry Anderson life is good. This owner of Yaba-Ding-Ding souvenir store Terry has brought up two children and spends her time living the good life at her Sandy Bay 'ranch.' She lives carelessly in a Baleneisian house with boyfriend Hugo, four Jack Russels, a Weimaraner and two horses.
"WHAT & WHY:Oriental design, bead decorated, flexible sole thongs were bought at Tienda Mariela for Lps. 360. The first shoes we've seen that had not only ornamental pattern on the inner, but on the outer sole. Her blue, elastic bellbottom jeans by 'Tiki and Pow' were a Carrion purchase for Lps. 400. Our personal favorite was a double buckle leather belt bought in Los Angeles for $20. Terry wears a brown, hand painted batique tank top brought in by Dianne Lynn and sold at Yaba-Ding-Ding. Her Guess shades in golden frames from Luna y Mar was worth $20, before being bitten be a Jack Russell terrier. "I don't think this affects my vision too much," says Terry. Around her neck the Californian wears a 1,000 year-old Yaba-Ding-Ding found in Trujillo by a Garifuna boy named Ivan. On a leather string the Indian faced jade artifact is complemented by two intense cobalt blue Alaskan trading beads. It's been 15years since Terry took her amulet off. Grandma's diamond ring was a "tactical gift." It's platinum with a gold shank. I like the combination of metals," says Terry. On her left hand she wears two rings: an Irish wedding ring that Terry wears with the crown up i.e. "unavailable." Her golden "Ooom" ring was her since childhood and Terry fought hard to get it back when it was stolen by a dishonest Roatan dishwashers.
IN CONCLUSION: Terry has been dressing as the hippie not grungy for a long time. You're as old as you feel and for Terry that is somewhere in her 30s. "I've got some wisdom on me," said Terry. She dresses trendy, but refuses to wear things that just don't make sense, "like long blouses with really short skirts. I wouldn't to be caught dead in something like this."

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: Jurgen Schafer, 45, has become ubiquitous with his 1972 land cruiser and a wide brimmed hat. This bigger than life, German 'Indiana Jones' has been living in Honduras for the past 14 years: in Guanaja, La Ceiba and for the last four years on Roatan. "I wanted to lead a more adventurous life than the one I had in Germany," said Jurgen. He has a wife and two children and recently begun working as an internet connection salesperson for TTI.
"WHAT & WHY: Jurgen has been wearing what could be the first and only green pair of jeans on Roatan. The pair was purchased eight years ago at a Hugo Boss outlet in Germany for around $30. Jurgen's leather Wrangler boots, well, at least the upper portion, date from Jurgen's eighteenth birthday in his hometown of Stuttgart. "They're half of my life," says Jurgen. The sole has been bought and rebuilt three times by different shoemakers in Honduras. "Will at the market rebuilt it for Lps. 450 from leather I brought from Siguatepeque," said Jurgen. "You look dressed well [even] in rain. Sand flies, mosquitoes, nothing bothers me much. You can slide in and get out fast," says Jurgen. To top-off the look Jurgen sported his wide brim hat "from China, but I bought it here at the West Bay mall." The accessory set him back $5. Still Jurgen doesn't accessorize much: no watch, ring or piercings for him. His blue cotton guayabera shirt by 'Jeno' was bought at the "American Store" at the La Ceiba mall for Lps. 450. The store specializes in importing last season fashion from Europe and the US. Decorated with a flowery motif the shirt softened Jurgen's rugged look.
IN CONCLUSION: Jurgen may have left Germany, but has managed to continue to shop for clothes there. Not an easy task, requiring commitment and ingenuity. Another Jurgen's commitment: to his boots is quite exceptional. Some people grow a special sentimental attachment to the clothes they wear. The shirts and socks wear down with time and become a bit unseemly. Leather boots however, allow for opportunities to renew commitment to the item we refuse to give up.
 

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: Anesika Kokui Beckley, 33, has begun her first "grown-up" tourist trip outside Canada by going to Honduras. Of Ghanaese and Jamaican descent, this Montrealese girl designs and makes jewelry, bringing her both fulfillment and money to earn a living. She has studied at four different colleges pursuing general knowledge.
WHAT & WHY: Anesika manages to trade, make, borrow, and bargain her way into wearing eclectic and hip ensembles. She has made the 'choker' necklace by herself from a memory wire and than strung it with glass and crystal Czech beads. Her shell based 'plant seed and stone' pendant was a trade with another jewelry designer. Her jewelry pieces are always one of a kind. "I don't like to make duplicates. When I make a piece, it's in the moment and spontaneous," says Anesika whose visit to Iravesia village outside of Puerto Cortez was an inspiration to make a copper based 'San Pedro's tears seed' bracelet. Anesika wears a a golden necklace given to her by her mother as a bracelet. Barely four days in Copan, Anesika has already found a job as a waitress at a local bar and found an excuse to weave a black, brown and green camouflage pattern night dress. "I nabbed it off my sister [Abui]," says Anesika, who is not like other tourists looking right at home mixing with the crowd. "I blend really well," says Anesika wearing her sister's synthetic stretch evening dress by 'Bedo.' Anesika actually spent only $5 on her entire evening attire. Her only purchased item was a 100 Lps. pair of read-brown flip-flops from the Puerto Cortez market.
IN CONCLUSION: Anesika hasn't really made any adjustments to her wardrobe. We were told she would look exactly the same on the streets of Montreal as she did on the cobblestones of Copan. "I love to be me wherever I go," says Anesika.

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: With her banjo and a Balinese flute at her side, even on the open seas Alicia Bonnett, 56, is always an entertainer at heart. Born in Brooklyn, for three decades she has lived in Oregon. In January, after crewing for three years, she sailed in to Roatan. She could only bring what would fit in her sailing bag: practical, versatile and adaptable. We caught up with her as she made her way from boat to town to do a bit of shopping. This was Alicia's town outfit. "It will not offend anybody by having anything that's too short, or too much exposed," said Alicia.
WHAT & WHY:The base of her outfit is formed by comfortable, strong Chaco sandals (with arch support) that Alicia bought on web for $70. Her Hawaiian print, black cotton skirt was a steal at $3 at an Oregon thrift store. The aquamarine rayon shirt was a gift from a friend during a 'clothes exchange session.' "It's everybody's things that they don't want anymore," explains Alicia, who managed to find herself the useful and comfortable top. "Someone's throwaway is other man's treasure." Her 70% sea grass and 30% paper shoulder bag by Faded Glory was another clothing exchange find. For everything that doesn't fit in the shoulder bag Alicia uses a four-pocket, double zipper, black backpack. Alicia found it in a Mazatlan 'mercado' for $8. "I looked a long time for this," says Alicia. Alicia's wide brim, ventilated, khaki Sun Day Afternoon hat keeps the sun off her shoulders. It was a sale item at an outdoors store - $17. There is even a bit of Honduras in Alicia's fashion. Her decorative shades - prescription sunglasses, $75, were assembled by Optica Clasic in Coxen Hole. Holding them on is a beaded eyeglass holder from Guatemala's Antigua - only a buck. The seashell beaded necklace is Alicia's own creation: all from Roatan beaches and held together by a nifty magnet clasp. Gale, Alicia's daughter, gave her mom a lapis and silver bracelet. A silver ring is a memento from her grandmother. To top it all off, Alicia adventurously combined two odd-paired earrings: a dream catcher turquoise earring on her right ear and crystal earring on her left.
IN CONCLUSION: For 25 years, before heading out to sea, Alicia was very much a business person. She made money and put smiles on people's faces with an unusual business: "Bubble's Singing Telegram and Clown Shows." After raising her daughter, Alicia has entered a new stage of her life, full of traveling and adventures. She has certainly found the right clothes for the journey.

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: "Living life on the front end," describing herself, Roberta Bienvenu, 53, is a licensed boat captain/dive instructor/nurse. This true Acadian works four months a year as a Louisiana nurse and then sails around the world in search of festivals, conventions and adventure in general. On Roatan, she lives on a 42' sailboat with her boyfriend Jim and works as a dive instructor with Ocean Connections.
WHAT & WHY:"Its not just any rubber jacket," says Roberta wearing her New Zealand made 'Line 7' XS sailors rain poncho with vulcanized seams. The XS Star Trek technology garment is made from one piece of PVC material with melted seams. With fluorescent hood for security and one pocket for yacht racing gloves and Bole sunglasses its pure: form follow function. "I wouldn't mind a little liner inside," said Roberta, who picked-up the poncho on the last day (sale day) at an Annapolis boat show for $125. Her Bole sunglasses Roberta found, again on the last day, of a DIMA dive convention for $42, down from $150. Underneath the poncho she wore an orange 'Camaro' dive swimsuit ($80) bought at DIMA. Her titanium Seiko dive watch as another bargain $200 (lowered from $600) picked-up there. "Part of being into fashion is getting a good deal. Anybody can go retail," said Roberta. We couldn't agree more. Her pastel, knit net pants by 'West Bound Beach' are perfect if you want to wear something that dries in two minutes flat. Roberta picked her rayon capris up at the fall sale at Dillard's. Her flip-flops were the greatest buy, $3, at a Cancun grocery store. With arch support, heel and snazzy transparent straps they could easily be mistaken for a Prada 2005 beach flops. Roberta is an accessories queen. On a right day, her pair of compass earrings could be potential lifesavers. All you need for one of the two to actually work. Roberta picked her 'Ted Aucoin' designer earrings at a Jazz fest for $80. "You want to keep quality in your jewelry. You know the other girls are checking you out," says Roberta. Her one gold earring is a souvenir from her first equator crossing on the way to the Galapagos. A silver bracelet came from Bali, her opal chain and ring are a souvenir from a friendship in Australia. On her wrist Roberta wears a friendship knot and a Santa Helena coconut bracelet she got for $3.
IN CONCLUSION: During hurricane and storm pour downs fashion has to make room for necessity, but not completely. There is now reason why one can't stay dry and look good at the same time. Wearing garbage bags should be anybody's last, and I mean last, resource. Roberta is a perfect example how to work with the weather not fight with it.

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: Rocio Alonzo Arana, 23, was born in Punta Gorda went to High School in La Ceiba and in 2000 she came back to live with her family. She works as the PMAIB director's secretary. We caught-up with Rocio on a typical Thursday - Thursday outfit.
WHAT & WHY:She wore blue, smooth weave Pepe jeans- a gift from Rocio's sister Sandra. Her narrow pink belt by Glamour was a Christmas gift from another family member- Kricia. Her tan leather boots with black side zipper by Highlights with two-and-a-half inch heels were picked-up at La Ceiba's Payless shoe store. In fact, Rocio could have the highest heels in Punta Gorda. We estimated the heel at three inches easily but Rocio was quick to correct us. "They're maybe two-and-a-half, but not three." Either way, wearing high heel boots on unpaved, sandy streets of Punta Gorda is no small ability in balance and a bit of determination. Rocio had a chance to take advantage of some work trips to Tegucigalpa to do shopping. Her jean jacket was picked-up at Almacenes El Rey in Tegucigalpa for $10. The 69 brand. In San Pedro on the other hand she found a pink and peach stripe mid sleeve blouse - Tiendas Panayote for $7 only. Diesel brand quartz watch as a gift from Rocio's cousin living in New York- Gina. Rocio admits that for every gift she receives five. Not a bad ratio for anyone, but how long will the gifts keep coming. One of Rocio's more personal items is her mother's engagement ring that she wears on her right hand. "Two years ago my dad died I became the 'mayor de la casa,' and I got the ring." On a lighter note, teddy bear shaped earrings and a necklace with enclosed wild flower inserts were bought from Ms. Rosa Silvestri's for $15.
IN CONCLUSION: PMAIB has no official dress code and Rocio takes full advantage of the policy by dressing every day of the week. "I'm one of the best dressed girls in Punta Gorda," says Rocio. "I'm also the best person dressed at PMAIB." Rocio certainly isn't shy and brings-up a notch the quality of the French Harbour PMAIB office- extra credit in most offices.

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: Most people know Orville Miller, 17, from Sandy Bay for dressing in official school uniform. But Orville has been leading a double fashion life. After taking off his school uniform he becomes a sporty, trendy young guy. We run into Orville in Coxen Hole tending to some errands, in anticipation of his bachillerato graduation from French Harbour's Technical Institute.
WHAT & WHY: His black and white, zip-up 'Portland' sport shoes were bought at a shoe store behind the Roatan Municipal for Lps. 450. "they are really comfortable," said Orville. His mid ankle white socks from Carrion were a perfect match for the sporty look. White, brandless, heavy, Bermuda jeans were a gift from Orville's mom- Ms. Laurie [Hynds.] His black leather size 32 belt with metal buckle was covered-up by a loose blue Tommy Hilfiger imitation shirt- Lps. 250 at Jerusalem store in Coxen Hole. A gold chain with Orville's carved name as a gift from his dad. Orville has been wearing it for 14 years. A silver plated bracelet on Orville's left wrist was designed by him and made by a local jeweler- Lps. 300, as was his metal ring- Lps. 200. "You just give them a sketch and they make it." On his right wrist Orville carried a leather bracelet with metal skulls and spikes. "I'm carrying it for a friend," explained his biker accessory Orville. For all his efforts, some people could find Orville at least a little bit intimidating. You can definitely hurt somebody with that accessory.
IN CONCLUSION: ""I'm just throwing in some pants with some shoes," Orville tries to explain himself, but we know there is something much more to his fashion statement than that. "I can go [dressed] like this to school only on Fridays. With longer jeans though," said Orville. After graduation the young man is thinking about pursuing his future in Alberta, Canada. Not to many occasions to wear shorts up there, mind you. "This is Orville's look." Enjoy while you can.

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: Corvin Reymond, 27, is certainly hard to miss. At 6'2" and around 245 pounds of pure fashion he is often the center of attention at bars all around Roatan: Twisted Toucan, Black Pearl, Pachecos. His typical night on the town begins with a bit of an energy boost: a rotisserie chicken dinner smoothed down with Redbull. "To get me energized," he explains. When we caught-up with Corvin at Twisted Toucan, he was wearing the "pimp look" one of his five patented ensembles: beach boy, muscle guy, bouncer and sporty. By day Corvin is a boat (Haydee) captain at AKR, where he has worked since he was 13.
WHAT & WHY: A long sleeved, white, semitransparent shirt ($70) is a part of an ensemble created by Corvin's Trujillo tailor- Jovanny. "He makes clothes for people who dress a little different." Jovanny comes to Roatan every two months and works on Reymond's predesigned suits. Black and white, size 13, laced gator shoes were purchased for $60 at amazing.com. A silver handle cane, with a cast head of a dragon, was also an amazing.com find - $55. "I just like the dragon. I used to watch the dragon movies, cartoons," explains Corvin. A white, brimmed hat with a white silk band put Corvin back another $45. A better bargain was a white Lps. 60 doorag found in La Ceiba's mall. Dark shade, white frame sunglasses Corvin found at Carrion for a bargain Lps. 75. Also there, he picked-up a gray and white tie tied in an unusual knot. It was his dad Astel who taught Corvin how to tie a tie, and Corvin progressed from there inventing his own "phat" knot. Three silver and stone plated tie clips, $5 each, came from Alex in Coxen Hole. Silver chain in the shape on an anchor was a gift from friend-Heather on Corvin's 25th birthday. On his wrist, over a white wrist band Corvin wore a 'bling' watch. For his night on the town Corvin brought a back-up yellow sweat towel. He wore two rings, barely big enough to fit his two pinkie fingers: a silver plated dollar sign ring and a silver band ring. "I have five more rings for each of my fingers," says Corvin. In two months "dragon head, a skeleton head, and regular ring" should complete Corvin's look. Corvin's says that 30 percent of his income goes towards clothes and fashion accessories. Fashion, especially "pimp inspired" fashion cost "mucho dinero." A smart move is using a trusted tailor and a well stocked website. Corvin gets a lot of bang for his dollar.
IN CONCLUSION: He says that he got his fashion bug from his father Astel Reymond. "I'm a fashion show person. I like to dress real good and impress people and make people happy," says Corvin, who is as much into having fun as making others have fun looking at him. "Most of the friends were impressed how I came up with this idea of [dressing] a pimp," says Corvin. With all focus on fashion and work Corvin has currently no girlfriend. A fact of life for any "aspiring pimp." "There are a few guys I respect, but they are not to the level that I dress," says about his competition Corvin.

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: He is a Roatan fixture, a landmark. Everyone on the island has seen, talked to, or had their windshield washed by this six-foot-two, "mogua," grey-haired, smiling man. Still, Alfred Alexander Dale, 48, is a new transplant to Roatan. He came to the island three years ago after getting to his last $100 bill of savings. Alexander was born in Barrio Ingles in La Ceiba and at the age of five moved to US to rejoin his parents living in Manhattan. He served thee years in the US army, lived for 10 years in Europe: in Germany and Spain working as a "transporter." Luck turned on Alexander in US when he received a three year sentence for a drug offense. After getting out, a judge ordered Alexander, still a Honduran citizen, to be deported back to his country of birth. It was January 2001 and Alexander had to restart his life in a country he had little in common with. He spent a couple years in La Ceiba and in 2003 moved to Roatan. But Alexander wasn't defeated. He lives in El Centro of Coxen Hole and makes his living as a baggage handler at Galaxy's dock. "As long as I have good health, I can do something. That's most important," said Alexander who also generates some extra income washing cars.
WHAT & WHY: His XXXL Tampa Bay Devil Rays jeans shirt, Alexander picked-up for $2 around the Coxen Hole market. His loose, black shorts were another used clothes bargain- $2. In order to do his jobs Alexander needs loose clothes that are easy to clean. Alexander's prized possessions are his $250 Brahma suede boots he bought a decade ago in Manhattan. "Since 1995 I had them in a box and just opened them a couple months ago," said Alexander who needs the heavy boots for all the lifting he does at the Galaxy's dock. He usually sports a small cotton rug to clean cars. "I work for whatever I got to do. I don't steal," said Alexander.
IN CONCLUSION: "Time to me is irrelevant," said Alexander, who wears no watch, or jewelry, but always manages to arrive when Galaxy is ready to dock and someone could need his help handling baggage. "I don't like attention. I like to be low key."

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?:Miss Jane Webster, 88, lives at her home in the middle of Coxen Hole. Corner of Main and Thicket in fact. She is an eternal bachelorette and takes pride at her many household skills: she cooks, cleans and gardens for herself and her older sister Marilee Rose Webster, 92. Miss Jane spent time in New York and Philadelphia and lived in Tela, but is a native Coxen Holian. We run into her at a local pharmacy, just a few steps away from her home.
WHAT & WHY: Her wide brim straw hat adorned with a cotton scarf, gives an impression of almost an angelical halo. It was a gift, five years ago, from Miss Jane's niece from New York. Miss Jane educated herself as a seamstress and has made her own clothes for many years. The light green, almost yellow dress is one example of her talent. Her dresses' design was inspired by different catalogues she has for reference at her home. The dress is simple but features a white embroidery lace around the neck and material covered buttons add another element of softness to it. Her comfortable black velvet slippers bought locally didn't quite match the elegance of her ensemble. "Oooh. I just put them on because I was going across the road," said Miss Jane. Who could hold this fashion impropriety? Miss Jane does deserve to feel comfortable anytime she wishes to. Miss Jane didn't wear, but one accessory. She leaves her jewelry, chain and earrings, only to her Sunday Methodist Church service and other special occasions. Her one accessory, a very functional and simple synthetic weave handbag was given by a Telaña niece, Ella Ray. "Its kind-of old," admitted Miss Jane. The design looks quite hip and urban actually.
IN CONCLUSION: Miss Jane has been dressing like that for quite some time. And dressing with style isn't easy. She has more fashion wisdom than three young Coxen Holians combined and she knows that comfort, simplicity and consistency is important, especially when you are 88 years old. "Some people don't believe it [that I am 88]. They say I don't look it," said Miss Jane. "God has blessed me and I am grateful."

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: "People here [on Utila] wear what they like. What they feel comfortable in," said Ms. Glenda Fernandez-Sanders. Still Glenda, from Sandy Bay, makes most people on Utila feel underdressed. This 42-year-old "domestic engineer" or "ama de casa" came to the island 26 years ago from Corozal, Atlantida. We caught-up with her at an open public event held under scorching Utila sun. She dressed to match the event with functionality and a bit of style.
WHAT & WHY: White, sleeveless shirt is a gift from her cousin living in Miami. The shape of the shirt is achieved by a corset-like string in the front of the garment. The semi-transparent blouse is perfect for any hot event. The sister-in-law presented Glenda with a pair of white pants ornate with navy blue floral patterns. The cool garment arrived from New York just in time for Christmas. The pants are made of stretch material, something Glenda finds practical, if not convenient. "If I get a bit fatter, I will stay looking the same," said Glenda. White, wood soled flip-plops with a heel matched her clothes. The "Plywood Fashion" shoes were bought by Glenda for Lps. 340 in a little store "somewhere in the center of La Ceiba." Glenda's white nail polish on her toe-nails gracefully matched the "white khaki" overall look of her ensemble. The plastic "Ray-Ban" sunglasses were bought for Lps. 170 from "Ms. Ana at her store in front of the Casino." Glenda loves to accessorize with gold. Still she likes to stay modest. "I don't like to wear five, seven golden chains," she explained. Curiously, Glenda wears two-and-a-half pairs of gold earrings. Two golden bands, and three studs. "Everyone asks me 'what happened to the other earring.' Well, I lost one piece three months ago and I still can't find it," said Glenda. Her husband bought her one of her earrings… five year ago. The other one was purchased by Glenda from Ms. Ana for Lps. 360. Golden Bulova watch was another gift from her husband. Her golden, marine theme pendants are a gift from her son Hoyt and her daughter Ivanna. Glenda also wears a gold ring with a red stone, bought in La Ceiba for Lps. 550.
IN CONCLUSION: Her husband, a sailor, decided to stay home, while Glenda and her daughter Ivanna represented the family at the Utila Health Center opening. "Ooooh. We exchange between ourselves a lot of things," she said about her 11-year-old daughter.

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: Tenisha Jeffries, 9, from Sandy Bay, attends third grade at Juan Brooks School. Her favorite subject is mathematics, particularly "adding." We caught-up with Tenisha at a birthday party for her cousins Brandon and Jasmine.
WHAT & WHY: Juan Brooks School enforces a uniform code, so Tenisha doesn't often have a chance to show her true colors. For this July afternoon it was definitely pink. The only day that students are allowed to wear non-uniform clothes is Children's Day. There's no doubt Tenisha took full advantage of this opportunity. Her cousin Igma gave Tenisha her pink "Little Babe" lace-up shirt for birthday number nine. Her mom gave Tenisha a denim mini skirt and pink belt ensemble. The belt was quite striking, with double rows of oversized holes. The hip skirt could work well at a Sandy bay party or school dance. Cousin Leilani got Tenisha her pink bow. Tenisha has no problem satisfying her fashion needs with a good supply of cousins, especially that at this stage of her life almost Tenisha's entire wardrobe is dependent on the good fashion will of grown-ups. "When I was first born [I got my two ears pierced]," said Tenisha who wore a pair of golden-like dolphin and ring earrings, a gift from her mom. The black, faux leather knee-high boots… "They were great… but they got a bit torn," said Tenisha. Wearing things a little bit worn, torn, or destroyed is always a dilemma. Especially when we have an emotional attachment, or nothing else that will do type of situation. Tenisha bravely decided to go out there with the imperfect, yet still stylish pair of heels. It's all about attitude and Tenisha certainly has enough of it to spare.
IN CONCLUSION: Despite having to choose out of "30 purses," choosing a purse for a party was a "no brainer." Tenisha went pink again. If you are thinking of giving anything to Tenisha, cousin or not, pink is a safe bet. When asked about her allowance and spending, Tenisha replied, "Sometimes I buy skirts, bags, shoes and socks, (…) I get a lot of money… a hundred dollars." Money can't buy you style, but it certainly helps.

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: Eduardo Zablah, 51, is the disputably the fashion guru of Honduras. He was one of the first Honduran models to make it big in the US and he came back to his country to spread the fashion revolution among the Ceibeños through his own clothing line: Eduardo's. We caught-up with him at Roatan Shrimp Festival where he helped to judge the kids fashion contest.
WHAT & WHY: His most visible wardrobe element was an "Eduardo's" long sleeved, white cotton shirt decorated with embroidered a green and yellow flower motif. The perforations allow for improved respiration, needed on this hot summer day. "Only three of the seven front shirt buttons were pined down, giving Eduardo a relaxed, almost dramatic look. Eduardo described his guayavera type shirt, "It's all hand stitched and detailed work. It's four hours of work when everything is ready for tailoring." The shirt will be available for sale at La Ceiba's, Gallo de Oro in December. His black, silk pants symbolize the pain Eduardo is feeling after the death of his mother, who passed away only a few weeks before. They are also part of his Eduardo's couture line. His slip-on, black leather shoes were bought in Italy for $75, discounted from $250. "Surprise! I can't tell you what brand they are," said Eduardo. Eduardo's accessories are a story in themselves. "This is original Pierre Cardin watch I bought on one of my trips to Miami," he said of his golden time piece of 22 years. Eduardo wears two gold chains around his neck. The thinner chain with a crucifix and face of suffering Jesus was a gift from his mother, who brought the medallions from Zablah's ancestral home of Jerusalem. The other, thicker chain holds a half-ounce of 'Credit Suisse Fine Gold.' You never know when you are going to need a half ounce of gold. The golden bracelet is of special importance to Eduardo. "This is a gift from my best friend [Rolando Puerto] who was killed four years ago," said Eduardo. His only ring is a gold band with seven diamonds he was given by Jean-Pierre, a jewelry designer he met on a trip to Italy.
IN CONCLUSION: "It's my design. It's very personal," said Ricardo. Combining his own creations with emotional, important symbols of his loved ones, Ricardo is certainly not afraid to walk and pave his own fashion path. Unless you are wearing no clothes at all, you can't get any more "fashion independent" than that.

fashion police

WHO & WHERE FROM?: Most people agree Utilans are relaxed dressers. These 8,000 or so nonconformist freethinkers are no slaves to fashion. A perfect example would be their island doctor, three year Utila resident Dr. John McVay, 51, It is hard to miss Dr. John walking down the street. He is the wild-haired, barefoot, rainbow of colors wearing man usually in the company of his dachshund.
WHAT & WHY: Dr. John studied at a University level for 11 years: U. of Akron, U. of Toledo, Auburn University and at the College of Osteopathic Medicine in Kansas City where he received his Dr. of Osteopathy title in 1983. He has worked as the primary physician at Utila's Community Clinic for the last three years. The fashion transformation from Dr. Jekyll to Mr. Hyde didn't happen overnight. "At first I would wear lab shirts," said Dr. John about his first months on Utila. Now he is one of the more adventurous dressers the island has ever seen. And it has seen a few. "My basic attire is that of a cheap Hawaiian pimp," said Dr. John. "Mis-matched colors, bright shirts, bright shorts. Tacky, tacky stuff. I don't have to buy shirts or shorts anymore. They all give them to me," said Dr. John. Leaving the responsibility for dressing to a community is a recipe for fashion disaster. Two lower buttons of his maroon and white flowery shirt are actually buttoned. "The only reason I button these two buttons is to cover-up my belly," said Dr. John. No shoes. Dr. John takes full advantage of Utila town's short distances. Dr. John draws his fashion line at his shorts: "I only wear Quicksilver [brand]. They've got better Velcro packets, better patch pockets and they hang better." His generic plastic sunglasses are actually industry safety glasses. His black, plastic Casio watch was another gift. His black leather medical bag, decorated with four tourniquets, is hardly large enough to carry all his medical paraphernalia and two packs of Royal "donkey killer" cigarettes. "I bought this bag in 1982. They made every medical student buy one," said Dr. John. The bag and a golden signet is one of the only memories of back home. "Everything else I left in the United States. I only brought this because I couldn't get it off my finger." A final accessory in high contrast to Dr. John is a very stylish and well accessorized Dutch hound. "Blood licking" Sue, named after an old girlfriend, wears a Harley Davidson black leather collar with steel studs and a brown plastic tick collar.
IN CONCLUSION: Clown pattern scrubs is as exciting as it gets in the American medical system. Even on Honduran mainland, even on Roatan, "Dr. John's look" would be a no-no as well. But Dr. John doesn't lack respect from the island's community. "Either take me the way I am, or don't call on me. I've already got too many patients." He pushes the envelope of medical fashion… perhaps on a world scale.

As the Doctor Sees it: “Dr. Von” at mayan@caribe.hn

THE PROBLEM
DR VON, I am a native of Roatan being born and raised here, however my parents managed to send me to San Francisco for my college and university years. I have just returned and I have run into a problem perhaps your influence can help cure.
We have accounts at Atlantida, B.G.A., LaFise, and Credomatic and have the need to use one, two or even all of them on a daily basis. After weeks of sending our assistant to do the banking and having to wait sometimes for hours on end for her return, I thought I would do the banking myself to see why she took so long. I now understand it is not her fault, but just whose fault is it?
In America one has the option of on-line banking, drive thru tellers, or going inside the bank. Whichever mode one takes up there, it is a fast and usually friendly experience, that takes just minutes no matter what time of the day or month. Well-trained tellers with vast experience using modern high-speed computers know exactly what to do and whip that money in and out with great agility. Why can we not perfect this simple science?

MY SOLUTION
This one caused me to do some investigative snooping, so I lunched with not just two, but three officers of three different banks. They all had the same story. It is due to highly understaffed, under paid workers, who cannot be properly motivated. There are short training sessions, faulty internet service, constant power failures, and rushes of people after a payday or holiday.
Why, I asked, are the drive through services unavailable? Again, lack of trained personnel, broken equipment, and a lack of extra help to man the windows. When they tried it, the cars backed up into the streets, causing traffic jams and irritated the passing motorists.
How about this, said I; a special window for the business people with large sums of cash and credit card transactions, a separate window for paying phone and electric bills, and a simple night deposit box for those simple deposit or bill paying chores?
Again the answer was lack of personnel and physical space. Those night deposits would not be worked on until the next night and that would take another shift that the budgets do not cover. Looks like on-line banking is the only sure way to beat the standing-in-line problem. So get computer literate fast, as they are here to stay.
As for the multitude of people looking for money transfers from the States, there is no hope for a more speedy method; just hope for more comfortable chairs to sit on while waiting.

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