Roatan Energy by 2016

January 1st, 2012
by

[private] Roatan has one of the most expensive energy costs in the Americas. This is a real motivation for installing alternative energy sources by big companies and individuals. In a place that charges 52 US cents per kilowatt hour, the investment in alternative-energy could be paid off just so much quicker. Diversity of energy sources is the key to lowering usage and energy costs on the island. There are several companies that have expressed interest in coming to Roatan. We list some of them below.

Farming the Eastern Wind (3.9  Megawatt)
On the slopes of Dixon Hill, Tradewinds Energy wind farm has planned to not only generate power but be a tourist attraction for cruise shippers. Tradewinds belongs to Kelcy Warren, owner of RECO. The wind turbines are currently being reconditioned in La Esperanza and at their peak should provide around 3.9 Megawatt. The spring and fall migrating birds flying over the island have not been notified.

Energy from Garbage (10 Megawatt)
Roatan’s waste management plant opened in 2003. Ever since it has been emitting gases and producing nothing but bad smells and pollution. Sunergy Renewable, T. Boone Pickens’ company, has submitted a letter of intent to the Roatan Municipality. The 10 Megawatt plant could be built quickly and operational in nine months. The plant could reach its full energy generation potential if an agreement is made to incinerate the garbage that visiting cruise ships leave behind.

In the Sea (3 Megawatt)
An off-shore energy plant that transforms salt water into hydrogen feeding fuel cells is as high-tech as it gets in the alternative energy business. Solier Energy Tek is looking at doing this technology off Roatan’s shores.

Pure Diezel (13.5 Megawatt)
If all goes well, and there are many things that would have to go well, the diesel generators used at RECO could serve mostly as back up with most of the power coming from alternative sources: wind, gas, etc. The peak power demand takes place in the summer months and is currently 13.5 Megawatt. RECO has no plans for cheaper but more polluting bunker fuel to run its generators.

SG Waste Management Plant (3 Megawatt)
One day the Santos Guardiola waste plant will be working … probably. And when it does, it might serve as another place for setting up a synthetic gas power plant to provide power for the less developed part of the island.

Solar Energy Farm (18.5 Megawatt)
ONYX Services & Solutions is looking at creating a series of four to five solar plants that would provide power to big resorts throughout the island. Whether its just hype, spinning or a well thought out plan, time will tell. If it were to happen, the project would be the first solar energy plant anywhere close to its size in the hurricane prone Caribbean.

Personal Solar (1,000 x 600 Watt)
An off-shore energy plant that transforms salt water into hydrogen feeding fuel cells is as high-tech as it gets in the alternative energy business. Solier Energy Tek is looking at doing this technology off Roatan’s shores.

Lights at Night (500 Kilowatt)
Santa Helena doesn’t have its own power–yet. The island is home to around 600 people with a few homes powered by generators. The island is to receive a donated 500 Kilowatt diesel generator from Kelcy Warren, owner of RECO.

Off the Grid (600 Kilowatt)
Barbareta, site to the mega-home of America billionaire Kelcy Warren, is completely energy independent. It currently has four 150 Kilowatt diesel generators. No renewable energy here. [/private]

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