Marie Dominique Thomas

March 1st, 2011
by -

[private]

Who & Where From?: One doesn’t need a giant garden to create a work of art. Marie Dominique Thomas, an energetic woman with a piercing look, has turned an old West End banana plantation into a thing of beauty. Inspiration is key in creating a garden, and Thomas is not short on inspiration. Coming from cold Quebec town on Victoriaville, Thomas won several prizes for her gardens–a passion she has brought from Canada.
What & Why: Thomas’ garden sits in the back of “Cinco Continents” Bed and Breakfast, located at the entrance to West End. There are signs of the garden’s connection with other cultures and traditions: One corner of her garden is dedicated to the Garifuna with yucca, sugar cane, plantains, beans and chillies. Stones and stone piles have been placed “in remembrance” of Canada’s Inuit in the north. She cultivates herbs and medicinal plants as well, which help with detoxing and energizing. As she walks around the garden and explains its secrets, Thomas gathers lemon grass into a bundle that she says when boiled will help with sleeping. “I have a large library about the plants can be used,” explains Thomas.
In Conclusion: Compost heaps in the corners include fermented leaves and fruit skins that slowly enrich the soil. “The soil here is sandy, salty, with a lot of insects,” says Thomas. The garden is also full of ducks and yellow napped parrots. “This garden has been made from a real desire to express myself,” says Thomas.

Fashion Marie Dominique Thomas

Who & Where From?: One doesn’t need a giant garden to create a work of art. Marie Dominique Thomas, an energetic woman with a piercing look, has turned an old West End banana plantation into a thing of beauty. Inspiration is key in creating a garden, and Thomas is not short on inspiration. Coming from cold Quebec town on Victoriaville, Thomas won several prizes for her gardens–a passion she has brought from Canada.

What & Why: Thomas’ garden sits in the back of “Cinco Continents” Bed and Breakfast, located at the entrance to West End. There are signs of the garden’s connection with other cultures and traditions: One corner of her garden is dedicated to the Garifuna with yucca, sugar cane, plantains, beans and chillies. Stones and stone piles have been placed “in remembrance” of Canada’s Inuit in the north. She cultivates herbs and medicinal plants as well, which help with detoxing and energizing. As she walks around the garden and explains its secrets, Thomas gathers lemon grass into a bundle that she says when boiled will help with sleeping. “I have a large library about the plants can be used,” explains Thomas.

In Conclusion: Compost heaps in the corners include fermented leaves and fruit skins that slowly enrich the soil. “The soil here is sandy, salty, with a lot of insects,” says Thomas. The garden is also full of ducks and yellow napped parrots. “This garden has been made from a real desire to express myself,” says Thomas. [/private]

Comments (0)

Comments are closed.