Ann Wright Salley

April 1st, 2011
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Who & Where From?: Ann Wright Salley Came to Roatan to make hats, jewelry and art in a tranquil setting. Knotting while selling her creation on the street in West End she definitely found her niche. Ann made her way around Central America by volunteering around organic farms in exchange for food and lodging. She finds new types of yarn, bird feathers, and shells and creates jewelry that she sells touring the subcontinent. For Ann the journey is as much personal as it is research, reenergizing and healing.
What & Why: “I’m crazy about bandanas and scarves,” says Ann whose two foot long breads are carefully placed in a white, sparkly yarn hat and a pink, black and white bordered scarf. “There is a lot of energy focused on the head… so that’s very important.” Ann, soft spoken, easygoing hippie is regular at the Santa Cruz Bargain Barn. Her chartreuse and peach shirt was a steal at the Barn after finding it in a stack of other clothes and weighing it in to a cool $1. One thing that Ann says she wouldn’t buy at the Barn is underwears and bras. “I am not like I used to be. Her belt with white sequins “reminds me of one of the ballet costumes I had as a child,” says Ann who decided to take the belt on her backpacking adventure through Central America despite its delicate state. “That belt makes me really happy.” Her flip flops, a gift from her father Stephen Salley while visiting Cape Cod, are an exercise in ingenuity, “They are called L’bebe in Beize, Chelax in Guatemala”. When the strap broke, Ann didn’t throw away the $4 shoe ware, but saw it as an opportunity; she used an old tee-shirt rag and braded into a foot strap and tied it in a knot under the sole, definitely funky and cool. Ann’s more visible set of earrings were created by her from metal wire and jippy-joppy seeds. Her more subtle gold hoop earrings were a gift from her Grandmother Helen B. Salley. “Jewelry, fashion and clothing are an important spiritual element connecting me to my family,” explains Ann.
In Conclusion: Ann creates her own fashion avenue. Her one-of-a-kind creations reflect her personality and talent and recycling, inventing and creating something out of… not much. Bravo for the mystical globetrotter.

v9-4-fashion-Ann WrightWho & Where From?: Ann Wright Salley Came to Roatan to make hats, jewelry and art in a tranquil setting. Knotting while selling her creation on the street in West End she definitely found her niche. Ann made her way around Central America by volunteering around organic farms in exchange for food and lodging. She finds new types of yarn, bird feathers, and shells and creates jewelry that she sells touring the subcontinent. For Ann the journey is as much personal as it is research, reenergizing and healing.

What & Why: “I’m crazy about bandanas and scarves,” says Ann whose two foot long breads are carefully placed in a white, sparkly yarn hat and a pink, black and white bordered scarf. “There is a lot of energy focused on the head… so that’s very important.” Ann, soft spoken, easygoing hippie is regular at the Santa Cruz Bargain Barn. Her chartreuse and peach shirt was a steal at the Barn after finding it in a stack of other clothes and weighing it in to a cool $1. One thing that Ann says she wouldn’t buy at the Barn is underwears and bras. “I am not like I used to be. Her belt with white sequins “reminds me of one of the ballet costumes I had as a child,” says Ann who decided to take the belt on her backpacking adventure through Central America despite its delicate state. “That belt makes me really happy.” Her flip flops, a gift from her father Stephen Salley while visiting Cape Cod, are an exercise in ingenuity, “They are called L’bebe in Beize, Chelax in Guatemala”. When the strap broke, Ann didn’t throw away the $4 shoe ware, but saw it as an opportunity; she used an old tee-shirt rag and braded into a foot strap and tied it in a knot under the sole, definitely funky and cool. Ann’s more visible set of earrings were created by her from metal wire and jippy-joppy seeds. Her more subtle gold hoop earrings were a gift from her Grandmother Helen B. Salley. “Jewelry, fashion and clothing are an important spiritual element connecting me to my family,” explains Ann.

In Conclusion: Ann creates her own fashion avenue. Her one-of-a-kind creations reflect her personality and talent and recycling, inventing and creating something out of… not much. Bravo for the mystical globetrotter. [/private]

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